BREAKING NEWS: YOUR DOG’S FOOD IS NOT MADE WITH A SUBSTANCE FROM MARS

First of all, I’d like to give a huge THANK YOU for the overwhelming support you all gave me after last week’s relaunch of the site. I’m so excited that you’re excited! Your encouragement and enthusiasm made all the work I put into it way worth while.

Now, let’s talk about food.

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Hi, I am a dog trainer who uses food in training – and I absolutely love it. I train using primarily positive reinforcement. What this means is that I add something good to increase the likelihood of a behavior occurring again. If I add something and it does not increase the behavior, it’s not doing the job. More importantly, it’s the learner who decides what is reinforcing and what isn’t. Just because you want Fluffy to enjoy pets does not mean Fluffy will enjoy pets.

The thing about food is that it is a primary reinforcer, meaning animals are hard wired to like it and want it. Most of the time, food is good enough to make a behavior happen again (depending on the difficulty of the behavior and the value of the food, but that’s for an entirely different post). Toys, praise, etc. are not always a good enough reinforcer, at least in the beginning, to increase a behavior. It’s like the equivalent of giving you a glass of lemonade to mow the lawn, versus giving you $20 to mow the lawn. Which is more motivating? (Trick question: it’s actually your spouse’s nagging.)

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As much as we would love our dogs to work with us “just because they want to,” that is not the case. They don’t want the glass of lemonade. Well, some do. But most don’t. We need to pay them and make it worth it for them. There are times when toys or praise just won’t cut it with our dogs, especially for tough behaviors like not going bat s*%t crazy when the doorbell rings. Using food in training allows us to mark and reward behaviors we like so that our dogs begin to do them more often. Stay calm to earn a “good boy!” from my human? No thanks. Stay calm for some juicy hot dogs? Now you’re talking!

I totally understand the concerns people have about using food to train their dog. The three gripes I hear most often are 1) I don’t want a dog who will only work if I have food 2) I don’t want my dog to get fat and 3) I don’t want my dog to think he now deserves my people food. Here’s the shocking part to a lot of people: trainers who use food don’t want any of those things either!

If you use food correctly, you can avoid all of those issues. Seriously! 1) Don’t go to your treat stash until after your dog has completed the behavior. As in, don’t stick the treat in front of Fluffy’s face and then give the cue. Give the cue, then treat. This makes it a reward, not a bribe. 2) I’m a big fan of shifting calories away from the food bowl. This is a win-win because your dog is working for his meals and therefore not taking in a ton of extra calories, and he’s getting extra mental stimulation! Which we know is super important. Lastly, 3) People food is only “people food” if it comes from the dinner table. Have you checked out the ingredients labels on your dog food bag? It (hopefully, ha) consists of what we consider “people food” – not a foreign substance from a faraway planet. Your dog will not translate getting cheese as treats to automatically deserving a bite of your grilled cheese sandwich. (But then again if he does think that, just teach him an awesome “place” behavior while you eat dinner and maybe he can get a bite or two!?)

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Do I fade the food eventually? For many behaviors, yes. Or I at least move to a more variable rate of reinforcement with treats while transitioning to functional rewards like getting the leash put on before a walk or tossing the toy. But for some behaviors, like a potentially life-saving recall or serious behavior modification, I usually don’t. The strategies and theories behind how long and how often we use food are a bit more complex and for another post.

Now, of course, like with everything else in the dog world, there are exceptions. There are dogs who will bend over backwards for their human’s giggle or for the toss of a ball. For those dogs, those functional rewards are more motivating and reinforcing. But most dogs need that food when you’re teaching them. I’m writing this because I had a really funny/borderline mortifying experience when I did a taping for a local news show the other day (which deserves its own post) and I wanted to address the whole “treats in training” debacle before I write about that experience. Because I don’t know about you, but I’m not working for just hugs, kisses or lemonade, no siree, Bob – and I wouldn’t expect my dogs to either.

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7 thoughts on “BREAKING NEWS: YOUR DOG’S FOOD IS NOT MADE WITH A SUBSTANCE FROM MARS

  1. fredrieka

    awesome write, I love it we adopted a senior dog in December 10 years old, had medical issues, and behavior issues, like knowing when to poop. She once was out with my Old sister Cissy and I and Dad, for 15 minutes came running back into the house and pooped on dadwithoutpaws foot. WOW was he mad, momwithoutpaws explain what needed to be done, well he doesn’t listen he gets the gift.

  2. Great post. You’ve inspired me to go “back to school” with my Ms. Bella who has slipped a little in her behaviors. A good reminder that learning is forever.

  3. Beth

    Great post. We always use food for recall. I’ve been able to mostly eliminate my dog’s tendency to eat ANYthing on the street that might be food (including poop!). I’ve been doing positive reinforcement training with tiny CHEESE bits – and she only gets cheese on our walks. [I had been using other treats but they did not work b/c they were not sufficiently high value!]

  4. cj

    Great post! However, I had trouble reading it- I was completely and utterly distracted at times by your *adorable* sidekick. You simply must introduce him…. her? :)

  5. minabey

    Great topic! my hubby’s dog, at 4 years old, I was able to teach some commands because he was so food motivated. Now we have a shih tzu (who we got at 4 months old & is now 1.5yo) and I can’t train him the way I did because he’s a picky eater. He doesn’t like most food plus he’s just plain stubborn. I don’t doubt he’s smart. He just doesn’t want to be bothered. He’s learned some commands but it’s a slow process. Please do a topic on this.

  6. Cutest dog ever?!?! Great post! I struggle with my boyfriend on this one — he says those 3 items ALL. THE. TIME. and I have a hard time getting this through to him. We have a “hard” dog who tends to be reactive, but he is SO food motivated that if he and I could get on the same page Ed would be a rockstar!

  7. Pingback: WINGING IT: OUR SMALL SCREEN DEBUT | Peace, Love & Fostering

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