Round Two & Why It Ain’t So Bad

When someone makes the decision to foster a dog, the next step is usually to decide what organization to do it through. This can often come down to choosing between going through a rescue group or fostering for a shelter. Any organization has their own procedures and policies, but private rescue groups and local animal shelters usually run their foster programs quite differently. Both can have pros and cons depending on what your own individual wants and needs are as a foster parent.

When Eran’s house got Rudy adopted through the Washington Humane Society, they reevaluated their needs as a foster home. After looking at many different options, they decided they wanted to try fostering through the rescue group Jasmine’s House. WHS has an amazing foster program and gives great support to their foster guardians, Eran and his roommates just wanted to try something a little different this time around. Jasmine’s House is able to give very individual attention since they keep the number of dogs in their program low, and their adoption application process is a little more in depth than many shelters. They can do this because they are a private, limited-intake rescue group. This can mean they don’t always have the same exposure or attention for their adoptable dogs as a county shelter though, which is another example of how different programs can work better for you depending on your needs and wants.

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Fostering through Jasmine’s House meant that when an applicant came up for Lady Bug, we were all able to discuss the best option on how to move forward. Because there are no hard and fast rules for how an application must move forward in Jasmine’s House, we could brainstorm what would work best for Bug and her potential adopters. You see, Lady Bug and her adopter absolutely loved each other, but there was another dog in the house and Bug and this dog didn’t really love each other just yet. We decided to do a “foster to adopt” situation that could act as a trial for Lady Bug and her potential new family. We all know that transitions can take lots of time, and we wanted to set Bug up for success by not setting in stone what her future was going to be.

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It turns out it was a good idea that we did not have them sign the adoption papers, because the new home ended up not being the best option for Lady Bug’s final stop – and that’s okay! Since it was just a foster-to-adopt situation, Eran’s house didn’t immediately take in another dog and they stayed mentally prepared in the event that they needed to take her back.  Her adopter was sad to see her go, but we appreciated that such an open line of communication was kept between each party so that Lady Bug’s best interest stayed in the forefront of all decisions.

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So now she is back where she started, and she’s enjoying quality time with her boys again. They are training her to know all sorts of new behaviors and they’re getting some medical issues back on track, so she is happy as can be. Plus, now I get to spend some more time with her. Win win for everyone!

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If you’re interested in adopting Lady Bug, email peacelovefoster@gmail.com.

One thought on “Round Two & Why It Ain’t So Bad

  1. Great post. I also think its really important to do a lot of research on a potential rescue/shelter before fostering as I’ve learned the hard way that some groups don’t have the networking capabilities, marketing initiatives or owner support initiatives to foster a productive environment for the dog or foster home. Ask lots of questions, check their event calendar making sure its git lots of great events planned, scope out their FB and Instagram to see how active and effective their postings are, etc.

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